Want to Make More Sales? Avoid Tyre-Kickers at All Cost!

What is a tyre-kicker? 

A tyre-kicker is a person who appears to be interested in making a purchase but never progresses to making a purchase. Tyre-kickers frequently engage with sales teams by asking questions, raising objections and prolonging the sales process without committing to a deal.

They’re the people that beat around the bush, question pricing and generally waste your time.

These are the types of prospects to get out of your pipeline as soon as possible so that you can focus your time and efforts on better opportunities.

Quality over quantity.

Although working on every deal might sound like the best way to close the most deals. Your time is better spent on quality leads with a higher chance of closing.

But how do you separate the tyre-kickers from your fully qualified prospects? Use these strategies to identify them.

They don’t match your target client personas.

The first way to weed out a tyre-kicker is to check if they match your target persona. There are a few questions you can ask yourself when deciding if a prospect is a good fit:

Are they within the industry you are currently targeting?

Do they fit the demographics of your ideal decision-maker?

Does your product or service fix a problem or fulfil a need for them?

If they don’t meet these essential criteria that your company or team has set, then they aren’t worth your time.

They haven’t done their research.

Decision-makers within companies are more informed than ever. They will often research potential solutions or products before speaking to a sales representative.

Prospective clients often have a general idea of what your business does and the value it can provide for them.

While you shouldn’t rule out cold leads altogether, bear in mind that it will take much longer to nurture them through your sales process. It’s particularly challenging to work with a prospect who maintains disinterest past the first or second interaction.

It takes extensive time and energy to educate your prospects on your service or product offering. From discovery calls to marketing emails and sharing content. If you continue to try and chip away at poor quality prospects, it will cut into the time you could be using to nurture viable business opportunities.

There is no urgent need.

Identifying a problem that can be solved with your service or product isn’t enough; you also have to determine how significant that problem is to your prospect.

Are they motivated to solve it?

Do they have a determined timeline for when the problem needs to be solved?

Is there a different issue they care about more competing for their attention and budget?

If your prospect isn’t showing a willingness to act or demonstrating a need to solve their issue, they might not be ready to make a purchase. They would be better off being moved into a nurturing process with your marketing team instead.

There’s no budget.

One of the most common tyre-kicker objections is budget. This can be a strong indicator they’re not actually interested in your service. Or, they simply can’t afford it.

If your prospect presents a pricing objection, we recommend using the following:

‘I completely understand. The best products are often more expensive.’

Using this response the first time you encounter ‘it’s too expensive’ helps you separate those prospects who genuinely don’t have the budget and those who are just kicking tyres. It’s impossible to sell your service to a prospect if they don’t have the budget or authority to use it – focus your time on those that do.

Where there isn’t a budget fit, provide them with free tools or resources they could benefit from in the interim. In this case, just because they aren’t a good fit right now. It doesn’t mean they won’t return when the budget is right.

They waste your time.

When you finally reach a prospect on the phone, if they go off on unrelated tangents or stray off relevant topics, you might be talking to a tyre kicker.

While it’s crucial to incorporate what your prospects want to talk about into your calls and personalise the experience, it’s also vital for you to meet your goals for the call and respect your own time. Otherwise, you can waste your days talking to prospects with no buying intention.

It’s key to outline your plan for each call or meeting. But if your prospect consistently takes over the conversation when you speak to them, it becomes challenging to make progress with them and could be an indicator that it’s time to walk away.

Just remember:

This isn’t a completely exhaustive list of ways to identify timewasters, but you’ll save yourself time by keeping them in mind throughout your prospecting and qualification processes. Don’t ignore your intuition or the warning signs. Chances are, if a prospect is showing one or more of these traits, they’re likely to be tyre-kicking and won’t move forward with making a purchase.

Remember, the best salespeople are those who can walk away from a deal when they recognise it isn’t a good fit for them. Instead, they use that time to nurture better prospects and making deals!

Published: 5th April 2021

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