Tag Archives: Remote Working

How Personal Growth Leads to Business & Client Growth


Guest Blog by Chantelle Stubbings.

So, before we get into how my personal growth helped my clients. Let me introduce myself! My name is Chantelle and I have worked within the sales industry now for a little over seven years. 

I always knew that I wanted a job where I could focus on personal growth and contribute to whatever business I was a part of; that’s what led me to sales. My first sales role was working within the Telecommunications industry, offering phone lines and broadband to other businesses. I worked there for just over three years, but I had started to feel that I needed a change. My heart wasn’t in it, and my options were beginning to feel limited. 

A Fresh Start.

It wasn’t long after that Darren (the founder of Intelligent Talk) approached me on LinkedIn. I met with him, had my interview and was quickly sold on the company. Intelligent Talk gave me the belief in the sales industry I was missing, and I haven’t looked back. I’ve now been part of the team at Intelligent for over four years.

I took to the training and coaching from Darren like a duck to water. And it wasn’t long before I started my first full-time business development campaign. This particular campaign was working within an industry that I wasn’t familiar with and required a lot of research before I started. 

The campaign was to contact law firms and to speak with heads of conveyancing. Then to understand their needs and requirements before recommending the service we represented. The campaign was very successful, and I worked with them for around four months.

Personal growth pays off. 

During this time, we had also started to work with Capita Integrated Business Solutions who specialised in Financial Management Software. However, the campaign wasn’t seeing the results we had initially expected, and I was asked to step in and support following my recent successes.

Through a lot of hard work, I maintained Capita as a client for two years. I was tasked with speaking to Financial Directors, Chief Financial Officers, and Procurement Directors within the Public Sector, contacting NHS, Councils and Local Government Authorities, offering Integrated Financial Solutions. 

As time went on with Capita, the campaigns I ran began to change. For the first few months, it was solely the UK, then branched out into Ireland, running several different campaigns from arranging face-to-face meetings to organising webinars. It might sound easy, but this campaign came with a whole new set of challenges!

Each campaign requires a different focus and set of skills, meaning that my personal growth as a salesperson was always at the forefront of my mind. I wanted to do the best for my clients and meet any challenges that came my way.

This focus on personal growth allowed me to build campaigns to a high level of success and seamlessly transition to others with the same high level of service and output.

Another happy customer.

When the time came to move on from Capita, I then went on to partner with a company called Cinos.

Cinos specialised in Video Conferencing for the NHS, and I was tasked with identifying high-level decision-makers such as CTO’s and IT Directors.

Working with Cinos required a multi-channel approach of making calls and developing effective LinkedIn messaging and email campaigns that proved to be very successful.

At this time, I also started to work with Refero, who offered a similar service. Refero offered telephone and video conferencing within the NHS, however, targeting clinical board members. 

After running a successful campaign with Cinos, I was also able to extend the Refero campaign for another term. Unfortunately, we were forced to pause this campaign due to the Covid-19 pandemic.

Post-pandemic progress.

Through the pandemic, I started working with Finastra. As a company, we had worked with Finastra many times before, and this was the third time I worked with them. Each of their campaigns and their offerings has always been entirely different; however, the most recent campaign was very new to Intelligent Talk.

I was tasked with researching Challenger Banks and Foreign Exchange companies both within the UK and the US markets. Even though we had worked within the US market before, this was the most extensive campaign I have ever done.

I managed to identify numerous challengers banks and foreign exchange companies across the UK and the US and the correct decision-makers. I was tasked with speaking to the CEO, CTO or Managing Directors.

This again was a very successful campaign and extremely enjoyable. I was able to branch out into a completely new market and learnt a lot from it. When I started, I hadn’t worked in the US markets. I had to learn a whole new way of approaching business development, relationship building and tonality. Not to mention balancing different time zones!

I could not be any more grateful for the opportunity to continue my personal growth and increase the number of skills in my sales arsenal.

The journey.

Being part of Intelligent Talk for as long as I have really has sculpted the salesperson I am today. I’ve learnt so much, and the many opportunities for personal growth have been invaluable.

Coming from a sales environment where it was just appointment after appointment no matter the quality, purely quantity over quality. To one where we genuinely care about our clients, their goals and how we as a business partner can support them. It is the quality of the relationship that matters for me, and to find a company that supports and encourages that was a breath of fresh air.

I have learned so much working with a diverse client base, offering different products. Not to mention speaking with all the wonderful people in other countries, at the top of their field! Each client, prospect, colleague, and service offering has taught me something new and helps me do the best I can for my clients every day.

Published: 17th May 2021

10 Signs Your Remote Teams Aren’t Collaborating Effectively And How To Fix It.


Your teams are having too many meetings.

Have you ever had days where you jump from meeting to meeting with little to no time for a break? Sometimes, this can actually be a symptom of poor communication and lack of collaborating between remote workers. 

Typically, your team shouldn’t have to meet several times a week. In fact, plenty of meetings could just be an email. 

keep in mind when scheduling a meeting that every person you invite needs to be there. If not, you could be wasting peoples time if their attendance is optional simply let them know. Plus, think about the length of your meetings if it can be shorter make it shorter if it can be an email make it an email. 

It’s important to be intentional when planning remote meetings.

The digital body language is all off.

When communicating on video, it’s easy to forget about your body language and that of those around you.

It’s important to keep in mind that on camera, nothing is subtle, and it can feel like you’re under the spotlight. This means you have to pay even more attention to your body language: maintain eye-contact, speak clearly and keep your setting as professional as possible.

There are team members not contributing during meetings.

If your team meetings are always dominated by the same people speaking up it could be a sign of poor communication. 

It could mean that there are people within your team that don’t feel comfortable talking during meetings.

While it’s important to consider that some people are more introverted than others, consider ways of including your whole team in discussions.

Your team isn’t collaborating.

Do you collaborate when the opportunity arises? From a management perspective, do you notice when members of your team aren’t collaborating?

If collaboration isn’t coming naturally to your team, it could be that they don’t feel Comfortable reaching out to each other or they don’t have the tools they need to collaborate effectively. 

You could introduce systems such as Trello to keep track of your assignments with this tool you can easily collaborate with other team members when you need to lean on each other for expertise. 

There’s a lack of communication throughout the day.

Being able to go days at a time without talking to other co-workers is a big red flag That your team isn’t communicating well. 

The more you talk to your colleagues the more trust you’ll have. This makes it easier to reach out when you need help or a bit of extra expertise. That’s why it’s important to create an environment where your team feels comfortable communicating throughout the day even if it is just to send a GIF into the group chat. 

Magazine why you don’t want to inundate your team with messages checking in every so often is a great way to build camaraderie and encourage team collaboration. 

Your meetings lack structure or agenda. 

Without an agenda or meeting structure you won’t be communicating effectively during your meetings making collaboration even more difficult. 

Meetings should always be organised and structured so that they are productive having an agenda will help you keep things on track. 

You may even want to schedule in 5-minutes of informal chat before the meeting gets started this will help team members to self-regulate. 

Wherever possible you should always send the agenda prior to the meeting however this isn’t necessary with regularly scheduled meetings such as an end of week meeting where the expectation has already been set. 

Your team hasn’t built psychological safety.

As part of a remote team, sometimes it can feel hard to feel included. However, the option to be included is so important for your teams’ mental wellbeing. 

When people don’t feel included, they won’t feel comfortable speaking up or collaborating in team projects. 

To build this psychological safety net in a remote meeting make sure you go around giving everyone the opportunity to speak. Try and focus on bigger picture conversations and ask individuals specific questions. 

Additionally, you could also include more ice breaker conversations where everyone has to go around and answer a question. This can help people feel more confident about communicating further along in the meeting. 

Your team aren’t showing their appreciation for each other.

Building connections is the most important part of communication and collaboration. 

One of the easiest ways to do this is to express gratitude for one another. For example, your people should feel comfortable congratulating each other in a group chat. 

You could encourage sending each other birthday cards and celebrating personal achievements or just create an email thread of appreciation.

Expressing gratitude is a great way to renew your energy and creates a safe space for your team. 

Projects are falling behind or through the cracks.

Did you start the year with a plan of all the projects that are due to happen in 2021 but none of them seem to be coming to fruition? Or perhaps you’re unsure of the status of these projects? 

When this happens it’s usually a combination of lack of communication and collaborating between your team members. Alternatively, it could be a lack of technology to facilitate these projects.

Make sure you’re giving your team the best tools possible to collaborate on project management and track progress.

Your team has a high turnover rate.

If you can’t seem to hold on to great people, it could mean that your communication isn’t effective. 

When this starts to happen, it’s important that you speak to your team so that you can figure out what’s working and what isn’t. Create an open discussion where everyone is able to voice their honest opinions without repercussion. 

Working remotely can make collaborating with your team feel harder but it doesn’t have to be that way. If your team still needs a little boost, why not check out these remote working tips.

Published: 10th May 2021

How to be a Success in Sales Whilst Remote Working [8 Tips from our Team to Yours]


8 Tips for Remote Working Salespeople Straight from our Team to Yours

Maintain Your Routine.

While remote working, it’s easy to start to feel burned out. It’s hard to shut off when there’s no boundary between work and home, and you can end up working too many hours. There’s always this self-applied pressure to prove that you’re actually doing your job, and a lot of us overcompensate.

In a lot of ways, you are your own boss when you’re working remotely. So you have to stick to your start and finish times as you would in the office.

If you feel like you need support with this, ask a colleague to be your accountability buddy but make peace with putting in 100% every day without feeling like you have to prove you’re doing your job.

Since you won’t have structured breaks at home, you have to have the foresight to create your routine and be rigid about it. For example, get ready as you would on a day in the office. Make your breakfast, then put in your break times throughout the day scheduled in advance.

It’s easy to let the line between work and home get blurred. To make this easier to maintain, try using your calendar to block off time when you’re going to take lunch and when you’re going to start and end the day.

Create Your Remote Working Environment.

Without sounding like a broken record as a remote employee, the boundary between work and home is often marred. Which is why you should have a designated workspace and make it work for you.

Whether it’s a separate office or the kitchen table, maintaining a designated workspace can help create the boundary between work and home.

If you have a space, make sure to give it some love! Invest in your area; this could be with a new chair, better lighting, some plants or artwork to make you feel at ease, focused and ready to work.

‘I’m not a big fan of silence – I have a metronome I set on the landing when the house is empty, and I’m making calls. On days I’m not calling out, I’ll have music on or the TV playing in the background.’

Peter Knight – Intelligent Talk Sales Team

If you don’t have a separate space, even just putting everything away at night and taking it out again in the morning can help you create the boundary between work and home.

Take Your Breaks.

Usually, working from home means you’ll have fewer distractions.

Although this might lead to higher productivity, it can actually make it harder to take your breaks throughout the day.

At home, you don’t have the built-in breaks you might have throughout the day at the office. Your friends and colleagues aren’t stopping by to grab a coffee. It’s unlikely that someone from a different department is going to show up at your desk and ask if you’ve got a few minutes to help with something.

‘Unless I have something scheduled in or I’ve got a call booked, lunch is booked in religiously for 12-1 here. It’s in my timetable, and that is my bible!’

Emma McCormack – Intelligent Talk Business Development Team

We know it’s easy to get stuck in the trap of skipping breaks or working through lunch. But, this is a sure-fire way to feel burned out in your role. That’s why you need to remember to take breaks and recharge your energy.

Stay Social.

One of the most significant drawbacks of remote working is the feeling of isolation.

To combat this, remember to be social during your working day. You can still network and chat with your colleagues while you’re all working from home.

‘Stay connected – It’s so helpful to talk and interact with everyone regularly, whether it be about a campaign, about what we read or what we get up to outside of work, helps to feel connected to the team.’

Chantelle Stubbings – Intelligent Talk Sales Team

Even just reaching out on teams or scheduling a video chat for a virtual coffee can help you feel more connected to your team.

When everyone is busy on the phones and don’t have time for a video chat, even sending a quick message to talk can be helpful.

Share Your Schedule.

One struggle you may face while working from home arises if you have roommates, partners, children, or even pets in the house.

If this is the case, it can be easy to get distracted. Plus, if you’ve got partners or housemates also working from home, it can be hard to coordinate working areas daily.

If this is the case for you, communication is vital.

Make sure you send your schedule to everyone in your household to plan who will be working in which space is. If you want to work in your home office, for example, let your roommate know that they can work in the living room or kitchen area.

Try and use a room that has the least traffic, and by sharing your schedule, you can let your housemates or partner know when they can and can’t interrupt you so that they don’t come barging in on any meetings you may have.

Reach Out.

Although you’re working remotely, you still have to deal with all of your job’s regular stress and challenges.

When these problems arise, don’t be afraid to speak up.

It can be tough to reach out when you need help at the best of times, let alone when you’re working remotely; that being said, you should always speak to your manager or team as soon as possible. That way, you get the help and support you need when you need it.

Maintain consistent weekly meetings and use video chat to make the most out of your communications and ensure that you’re never too far away from a check-in with your manager should any problems arise.

Dress for Success.

The way you start your day can significantly impact your mood and productivity.

Getting up getting showered, and dressed just as though you’re going to the office can make a huge difference for you.

Although you may be able to get away with leisurewear working from home, you should maintain a certain level of professionalism if you’re going to be in meetings and representing your company on video chats.

Be Organised.

Another difficulty of remote work can be that it’s hard to manage your own time and stay organised. The best way to deal with this is to use your calendar to block off time to complete important tasks.

‘Take ownership of time management – I struggled to keep myself on track with the admin parts of my work, like creating reports, but creating a school-style timetable for myself really gave me clarity on what I should focus on and when.’

Liam Patrickson – Intelligent Talk Sales Team

To keep your deals advancing, it’s important to stay diligent with all of your tasks, whether you’re setting up calls, lead generating, or understanding your prospects expectations.

Remote Working Take Aways:

Although it can be intimidating when you and your teamwork remotely, it doesn’t have to be a difficult transition or damaging to your output. You can still collaborate, grow and connect as a team of remote sales representatives.

By following these easy steps, you’ll be able to thrive while working remotely.

How many of these tips do you use? Are there any that you would add? Let us know in the comments below.

Published: 3rd May 2021